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Volume 14, issue 2 | Copyright
Ocean Sci., 14, 205-223, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-14-205-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 15 Mar 2018

Research article | 15 Mar 2018

Orbit-related sea level errors for TOPEX altimetry at seasonal to decadal timescales

Saskia Esselborn et al.
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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (06 Nov 2017)  Author's response
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Nov 2017) by John M. Huthnance
RR by Nikita P. Zelensky (19 Dec 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Jan 2018) by John M. Huthnance
AR by Saskia Esselborn on behalf of the Authors (25 Jan 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (31 Jan 2018) by John M. Huthnance
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Short summary
Global and regional sea level changes are the subject of public and scientific concern. Sea level data from satellite radar altimetry rely on precise knowledge of the orbits. We assess the orbit-related uncertainty of sea level on seasonal to decadal timescales for the 1990s from a set of TOPEX/Poseidon orbit solutions. Orbit errors may hinder the estimation of global mean sea level rise acceleration. The uncertainty of sea level trends due to orbit errors reaches regionally up to 1.2 mm yr−1.
Global and regional sea level changes are the subject of public and scientific concern. Sea...
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