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Ocean Science An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 5, issue 3
Ocean Sci., 5, 351-368, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-5-351-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
Ocean Sci., 5, 351-368, 2009
https://doi.org/10.5194/os-5-351-2009
© Author(s) 2009. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  18 Sep 2009

18 Sep 2009

Metrics of hurricane-ocean interaction: vertically-integrated or vertically-averaged ocean temperature?

J. F. Price J. F. Price
  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02543, USA

Abstract. The ocean thermal field is often represented in hurricane-ocean interaction by a metric termed upper Ocean Heat Content (OHC), the vertical integral of ocean temperature in excess of 26°C. High values of OHC have proven useful for identifying ocean regions that are especially favorable for hurricane intensification. Nevertheless, it is argued here that a more direct and robust metric of the ocean thermal field may be afforded by a vertical average of temperature. In the simplest version, dubbed T100, the averaging is from the surface to 100 m, a typical depth of vertical mixing by a category 3 hurricane. OHC and T100 are well correlated over the deep open ocean in the high range of OHC, ≥75 kJ cm−2. They are poorly correlated in the low range of OHC, ≤50 kJ cm−2, in part because OHC is degenerate when evaluated on cool ocean regions, ≤26°C. OHC and T100 can be qualitatively different also over shallow continental shelves: OHC will generally indicate comparatively low values regardless of the ocean temperature, while T100 will take on high values over a shelf that is warm and upwelling neutral or negative. In so far as the ocean thermal field alone is concerned, these warm, shallow continental shelves would appear to be as favorable for hurricane intensification as are warm, deep ocean regions.

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